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Friday, January 3, 2020

Whoa, Nellie! Remembering Dick Lane, Wrestling and Roller Derby

by George Haloulakos

HAPPY NEW YEAR to one and all!  And for those of you who view the New Year as the beginning of the 2020s, HAPPY NEW DECADE!  Whoa, Nellie!  Where has the time gone?  Hopefully, it has been the basis for creating wonderful memories!  Using the exclamatory phrase "Whoa, Nellie!" provides a Maginot Line for baby boomers and their remembrance/association of how this became part of the boomer lexicon.


Dick Lane chats with "The Destroyer"

  Much younger baby boomers typically associate this phrase with former ABC sports announcer Keith Jackson but more seasoned boomers with a longer time line know that "Whoa, Nellie!" was actually coined by Dick Lane a longtime Southern California announcer who called play-by-play action for roller derby and wrestling from the late 1940s through the early 1970s.  [In fact, Mr Jackson himself acknowledged/credited Mr Lane with coining this phrase that both gentlemen used in their long, distinguished professional broadcasting careers.] For those who grew up in the Los Angeles area, Mr Lane is specifically remembered as the lead announcer for the Thunderbirds team Roller Derby on KTLA Channel 5 and Championship Wrestling on KCOP Channel 13.  These events were broadcast from the Grand Olympic Auditorium in downtown Los Angeles (built in 1924 and one of the few wrestling/boxing arenas still in existence from that golden era -- albeit now as a Korean-American evangelical church).  My father was friends with Mr Lane as both were members of the same lodge and I recall hearing personal accounts on how Mr Lane could make a simple dinnertime conversation a hyper-kinetic event with his energy, charm and genuine interest in people -- especially his fans, old and young alike!


The Olympic Auditorium

   Long before wrestling became a worldwide multi-media mega-billion empire, Mr Lane's signature calls helped elevate wrestlers like Jim Londos, Gorgeous George and Andre the Giant into legendary status while furthering the popularity of the sport.  Similarly, Mr Lane did the same with popularizing Roller Derby worldwide (especially in Australia and Japan) as the LA Thunderbirds reached a peak attendance of over 50,000 for an exhibition match in Chicago's Old Comiskey Park (September 1972).  Fittingly, in the same year, Mr Lane played himself as a roller derby announcer in Raquel Welch's memorable film "Kansas City Bomber."


  Mr. Lane was posthumously inducted into the "Wrestling Observer Newsletter" Hall of Fame (1996) and the Southern California Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame (2002).  The Grand Olympic Auditorium where Mr Lane demonstrated his broadcast excellence, remains an iconic landmark that transcends its Los Angeles locale, for I would guess that members of the Galaxy audience can relate to similar buildings that once existed in large and small towns alike all across the continental USA.  Even if you did not see such a building in person, you no doubt saw something just like it in Rod Serling's "Requiem For a Heavyweight" or the film noir John Garfield movies from the 1940s, or classic TV shows like "Route 66" and even the Sly Stallone "Rocky" film series that began in 1976.  The Grand Olympic Auditorium and Mr Lane are indelibly associated with a Los Angeles from an earlier period in our history - often eliciting images of smoke-filled arenas -- but transcend space and time as we are reminded of lifetime memories that have now become priceless treasures.

Please join us in celebrating the New Year by sharing memories of wrestling, roller derby and Dick Lane by posting to the Galaxy FACEBOOK page (and be sure to "like" us when doing so) or via e-mail to the GNN web site.  Likewise, I am always receptive to hearing from our wonderful Galaxy audience and/or connecting via LinkedIn. View my LinkedIn profile at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rev-protodn-george-haloulakos-cfa-bab6b43 

Saturday, November 30, 2019

A Very Mayberry Christmas

by George Haloulakos
It has been a longstanding tradition here on the Galaxy Nostalgia Network to pay tribute to the Holiday Season through our podcasts and this monthly blog. This year, we pay tribute to one of the best and perhaps one of the most beloved episodes of "The Andy Griffith Show." Aired on the CBS Network on December 19, 1960, "The Christmas Story" was the eleventh episode of season one and the only Christmas episode in "The Andy Griffith Show" complete series. A little known bit of trivia about this wonderful Yuletide episode is that it featured actress Margaret Kerry, who was the model for the Tinkerbell character in the 1953 Walt Disney animated feature “Peter Pan”.

Here is a summary of this sparkling episode: On Christmas Eve, Mayberry's curmudgeon and retail store owner Ben Weaver insists that Sheriff Andy Taylor jail moonshiner Sam Muggins. Andy complies with this request as Ben has physical evidence to support his charge of law breaking but also incarcerates Sam's wife (played by the aforementioned Margaret Kerry) along with their young son and daughter since they all had knowledge of Sam's moonshining.

 The story takes a most charming turn as Andy, Barney Fife, Ellie Walker, Aunt Bee and Opie decide to relocate their Christmas party to the Sheriff's office / jail so that the Muggins Family can celebrate the Nativity. They bring along a sumptuous feast with all the trimmings plus a Christmas tree. Everyone, including the Muggins Family, is decorating the tree while singing Christmas carols. Barney even dresses up as Santa Claus!


Ben Weaver, secretly watching from the window outside the jail, observes this Yuletide joy unfold and is deeply moved as well as transformed by the Christmas spirit. Weaver concocts several! unsuccessful schemes to get himself arrested so he can join the party. When Andy realizes this, he arrests Ben and then the TV audience witnesses the two men arriving at the jail with a suitcase full of wrapped gifts from Ben's retail store for everyone, including the Muggins Family. Ben is welcomed by one and all while enjoying the food and drink at the party. Andy releases the Muggins Family as there is no longer any evidence of wrongdoing. Reason? Ben is shown in the closing moments of the episode asleep in one of the jail cells after having finished drinking the jug of Sam's moonshine!
This Holiday episode from a classic TV show is one of many examples seen in other television series in the same era that remind us of the reason for the season. In this instance, we are able to witness in the span of less than 30-minutes why programs like "The Andy Griffith Show" continue to resonate in our hearts as they remind us of the importance of showing goodness, kindness and love to one another.

Please join us in celebrating the Holiday Season by sharing your favorite classic TV memories featuring a holiday-based theme by posting to the Galaxy FACEBOOK page (and be sure to "like" us when doing so) or via e-mail to the GNN web site. Likewise, I am always receptive to hearing from our wonderful Galaxy audience and/or connecting via LinkedIn.
View my LinkedIn profile at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rev-protodn-george-haloulakos-cfa-bab6b43https://www.linkedin.com/in/rev-protodn-george-haloulakos-cfa-bab6b43

Saturday, November 2, 2019

NFL Centennial

by George Haloulakos
This year marks the centennial anniversary of the National Football League (NFL) and we celebrate this great event through the prism of the amazing 21-year career of quarterback Earl Morrall (1934-2014).  Morrall is an NFL legend as indicated by his different monikers: King of the Comebacks, the Best of the Back-Ups and the Champion of the Understudy.   Any one who has played football at any level or in any venue knows the importance of the quarterback (QB) position, and can relate to the enormous competition to be the signal caller.  Morrall exemplified the preparation and commitment to excellence we all strive for, especially in sports.  By his own words he said that "when you get the chance to do the job, you have to do the job."  Morrall showed why it was prudent to be prepared at a moment's notice for such an opportunity.


Morrall elevated the importance of the understudy, and much more.  During the first twelve years of his NFL career he was a backup QB for the San Francisco 49ers, Pittsburgh Steelers, Detroit Lions and New York Giants.  In an era of legendary NFL QBs (Bobby Layne, Norm Van Brocklin, Y.A. Tittle, Johnny Unitas, Bart Starr, et al) Morrall showed himself to be a competent, efficient professional always ready to take the helm when needed if the number one signal caller was unable to play.  When Morrall joined the Baltimore Colts, his legend unfolded.  Taking over for an injured Johnny Unitas in 1968, Morrall led the Colts to an NFL Championship while earning MVP and All-Pro honors.  Two years later, he again came off the bench to replace an injured Unitas, this time in Super Bowl V, to lead the Colts to a last second victory thereby winning the World Championship!  Two years later, this time with the Miami Dolphins, Morrall took over as the QB from the injured Bob Griese and helped lead the Dolphins to an undefeated season plus win a playoff game.  While Griese returned as the starter for the AFC Title and Super Bowl games to cap the Dolphins' first World Championship, Morrall continued to work closely with head coach Don Shula (who was his former coach while playing for the Colts) in what can best be described as an informal but active player/coach role.  Having Morrall available to immediately step into the QB role enabled the Dolphins to not only achieve the only perfect season in NFL history, but go on to repeat as back-to-back Super Bowl champs the very next season!   Following his NFL career, Morrall mentored legendary collegiate QBs Jim Kelly, Bernie Kosar and Vinny Testaverde at the University of Miami thereby passing along the art of quarterbacking to a new generation.

Ironically, in this the 100th year of the NFL, there has been a rash of injuries to a rather large number of star QBs, thereby again elevating the importance of having a good substitute in the wings.  It would seem that NFL teams are all now eagerly searching for this generation's Earl Morrall just in case the situation requires an effective substitute to step in.  Earl Morrall showed what it means to be a leader and a great team player.  Don Shula described Morrall as an "intelligent quarterback who's won a lot of ball games for me."  There have been a lot of NFL QBs who are heroes of the game.  While heroes get remembered, legends never die.  Earl Morrall was a legend, and now almost 50 years since his stellar gridiron accomplishments, we salute this Galaxy Good Guy as one of the best to ever play the game, albeit in a back-up role!

Please join us in celebrating the centennial anniversary of the National Football League by sharing your favorite NFL football memories with us by posting to the Galaxy FACEBOOK page (and be sure to "like" us when doing so) or via e-mail to the GNN web site.  Likewise, I am always receptive to hearing from our wonderful Galaxy audience and/or connecting via LinkedIn.
View my LinkedIn profile at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rev-protodn-george-haloulakos-cfa-bab6b43  

Saturday, June 22, 2019

Baby Boomer's "Comedian Laureate" Passes Away

Tim Conway, the Emmy-winning actor best known for his role in "The Carol Burnett Show," died Tuesday morning in Los Angeles after a long illness, his publicist, Howard Bragman, said. He was 85. His wife, Charlene Fusco, and a daughter, Jackie, were at his side.
Conway also starred in "McHale's Navy" and later voiced the role of Barnacle Boy for "Spongebob Squarepants." An Ohio-native, Conway credited his Midwestern roots for putting him on the right path to laughs, with his deadpan expression and innocent, simple-minded demeanor.

"I think the Midwest is the heart of comedy in this country, and a little bit of the South, too," he told the Wisconsin State Journal in 2005. "For some reason, we're just more laid-back, more understanding. ... And Midwesterners have a kinder sense of humor."

Starting with the 1975–76 season, Conway became a regular on The Carol Burnett Show, after having been a frequent guest for the show's first eight seasons.[10] Conway's work on the show earned him four Emmy Awards — one for writing and three for performance, one of which was before he became a regular. Two of Conway's memorable characters on the Burnett Show were:[citation needed]

The Oldest Man, whose shaggy white hair, slow speech, and shuffling gait ran counter to the much-needed energy levels of the various occupations in which he was usually found. His comic inability to get said jobs done — usually with slapstick results to himself and, with many an ad-lib — both frustrated and "broke up" his fellow sketch performers.
Mr. Tudball, a businessman whose intentions of running a "ship-shape" office were usually sunk by the bored indifference of his secretary, Mrs. Wiggins (Burnett). Although the character was widely thought to be Swedish, Conway used a Romanian accent learned from his mother.[18] For example, his attempts to pronounce his secretary's name came out as "Mrs. Uh-whiggins". He also used this accent for other characters, such as an inept dentist.
Conway could also get results with no dialogue, such as in a sketch in which he played a tired businessman seeking restful sleep in his hotel — and pestered by a housefly, created only by a sound effect and Conway's gazing after it. After much struggle, he manages to get the fly out of the room through the window; after returning to bed, he hears a persistent knock on his door, gets up to answer it, and opens the door, letting the fly (who was doing the knocking) back in.[citation needed]

Another skit, also without a word from Conway, featured him playing Simba, a lion raised by humans then released to the wild (based on the lioness Elsa in the film Born Free). Conway, told of the upcoming eviction from the comfortable home, caused Burnett and Harvey Korman to break up with an interminable process of packing to leave.[citation needed]

A prime example of his ability to make his co-stars laugh uncontrollably involved Lyle Waggoner as a captured American airman, with Conway as a stereotypical blond-haired Gestapo agent charged with his interrogation. Stating that "the Fuhrer" had taken particular interest, Conway produced a small Hitler hand puppet. Conway suggested to the puppet that singing might relax Waggoner's character to the point he is willing to talk. In a long, drawn-out fashion, the Hitler puppet (Conway providing a falsetto voice, with German accent) sings "I've Been Working on the Railroad", and with each passing verse, Waggoner loses more of his composure, finally laughing hysterically when puppet-Hitler screeches, "FEE-FI-Fiddely-I-O!".[citation needed]

Conway remained a regular cast member of The Carol Burnett Show until the program's run ended, in 1978

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Remembering Glen Campbell






American singer Glen Campbell passed away on August 8, 2017, after a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease.  He was 81.  He is remembered not only for his numerous songs he performed, but also for his acting, songwriting, guitar playing, and television hosting work over the years.   Among Campbell's hits are "Gentle on My Mind", "By the Time I Get to Phoenix", "Wichita Lineman", "Galveston", "Rhinestone Cowboy" and "Southern Nights".  Glen's earliest work was as a session musician working with many famous artists such as Bobby Darin, Ricky Nelson, Dean Martin, Jan and Dean, and Elvis Presley just to name a few.  He was also part of the original "Twelve String Guitar" playing with Doug Dillard, Rod Dillard, and Dean Webb. 

Additionally, Glen Campbell was an actor and television host, appearing in such films as "True Grit", "Norwood", and "Any Which Way You Can".  His television work also was numerous, hosting his own show "The Glen Campbell Goodtime Hour", and making guest appearances on such shows as The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson, The Donny and Marie Show, The Mike Douglas Show, and The Midnight Special with Wolfman Jack.  Additionally he appeared on numerous TV specials and made for TV movies.

For many of us growing up in the Baby Boomer years, Glen Campbell was a part of our childhood and our youth.  His songs take us back to another time and another place.  The Wichita Lineman is still on the line...and always will be.  We remember Glen and will share memories of him and his music in an upcoming episode of Galaxy Moonbeam Night Site. 


Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Remembering Mary Tyler Moore


TV icon Mary Tyler Moore passed away on Wednesday, January 25, 2017, after being hospitalized in Connecticut. She was 80. Mary Tyler Moore is best remembered for her starring role as Laura Petrie on the "Dick Van Dyke Show", and her role as Mary Richards on the "Mary Tyler More Show".  In addition, she appeared in television commercials, motion pictures, and as a guest on many TV programs.  Baby Boomers have a special relationship with MTM.  She was a very prominent part of our growing-up years.  On an upcoming episode of Galaxy Moonbeam Night Site, we'll look back on the life and career of this girl "Who Could Turn the World on with Her Smile".  Join us for this tribute to one of our favorite actresses. 

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

The Plane! The Plane! Here's the Passenger List, 40 Years Later

On Friday night, January 14th, 1977, prime-time TV viewers were introduced to Fantasy Island, a weekly ABC series that featured a who's-who of celebrities from the 1930s through mid-1970s. 

Mr. Roarke (Ricardo Mantalban) and Tatoo (Herve Villachaize) opened each show by greeting a planeload of folks fixated on living out particular fantasies. Most viewers were always anxious to see how the episode's featured movie or TV stars would spend the next 45 minutes chasing their dreams, or in many cases fleeing the subsequent nightmare of having had those dreams come true.


As Boomers well in to early adulthood in the mid 1970s, most of us had our favorite TV or silver screen celebs. Some may or may not have appeared on Fantasy Island. Here are the prominent notables that appeared during the 1977-1984 series run of Fantasy Island is now available. For You Fantasy Island fans, Here's The List, The List:

Ian Abercrombie
Don Adams
Edie Adams
Neile Adams
Claude Akins
Robert Alda
Norman Alden
Frank Aletter
Steve Allen
Don Ameche
Morey Amsterdam
Bridgette Andersen
Loni Anderson
Melissa Sue Anderson
Michael Anderson, Jr.
Richard Anderson
Edward Andrews
Michael Ansara
R.G. Armstrong
Desi Arnaz, Jr.
Lucie Arnaz
Alison Arngrim
Lewis Arquette
Luke Askew
John Astin
Frankie Avalon
Leah Ayres
Lew Ayres

Jim Backus
Hermione Baddeley
Jane Badler
Max Baer, Jr.
Jimmy Baio
Scott Baio
Richard Bakalyan
Diane Baker
Judith Baldwin
Carl Ballantine
Kaye Ballard
Adrienne Barbeau
Andrea Barber
Joanna Barnes
Douglas Barr
Gene Barry
Ivor Barry
Billy Barty
Jaime Lyn Bauer
John Beck
William Beckley
Noah Beery, Jr.
Ed Begley, Jr.
Christine Belford
Ralph Bellamy
Brenda Benet
Barbi Benton
Polly Bergen
Milton Berle
Crystal Bernard
Ken Berry
Martine Beswick
Theodore Bikel
David Birney
Bill Bixby
Vivian Blaine
Janet Blair
Linda Blair
Joan Blondell
Lloyd Bochner
Ray Bolger
Danny Bonaduce
Frank Bonner
Sonny Bono
Linwood Boomer
Lynn Borden
William Boyett
Neville Brand
Clark Brandon
Bart Braverman
Rossano Brazzi
Peter Breck
George Brett
Ken Brett
James Broderick
Foster Brooks
Johnny Brown
Peter Brown
Reb Brown
Robert Brown
Kathie Browne
Pamela Jean Bryant
Horst Buchholz
Ray Buktenica
Brooke Bundy
Victor Buono
Gary Burghoff
Delta Burke
Paul Burke
LeVar Burton
Dick Butkus
Dean Butler
Red Buttons
Edd Byrnes

Rory Calhoun
Michael Callan
Joseph Campanella
J.D. Cannon
Diana Canova
Macdonald Carey
Darlene Carr
Vikki Carr
John Carradine
Victoria Carroll
Ric Carrott
Jack Carter
David Cassidy
Joanna Cassidy
Mary Jo Catlett
Paul Cavonis
George Chakiris
Judith Chapman
Cyd Charisse
Charo
Dane Clark
Robert Clary
Julie Cobb
Imogene Coca
James Coco
Iron Eyes Cody
Dennis Cole
Michael Cole
Gary Collins
Joan Collins
Christopher Connelly
Chuck Connors
Hans Conreid
Michael Constantine
Frank Converse
Bert Convy
Keith Coogan
Teri Copley
Glenn Corbett
Alex Cord
Lydia Cornell
Joseph Cotten
Ronny Cox
Yvonne Craig
Broderick Crawford
Linda Cristal
Patrick Cronin
Pat Crowley
Melinda Culea

Arlene Dahl
Cathryn Damon
Stuart Damon
Bill Dana
Royal Dano
Cesare Danova
Kim Darby
James Darren
James Daughton
John Davidson
Geena Davis
Patti Davis
Phyllis Davis
Sammy Davis, Jr.
Richard Dawson
Laraine Day
Jimmy Dean
Rosemary DeCamp
Yvonne De Carlo
Sandra Dee
Don DeFore
Gloria DeHaven
Bob Denver
Khigh Dhiegh
Charles Dierkop
Bradford Dillman
Elinor Donahue
Troy Donahue
James Doohan
Ann Doran
David Doyle
Howard Duff

Leslie Easterbrook
Herb Edelman
Samantha Eggar
Nicole Eggert
Ike Eisenmann
Britt Ekland
Jack Elam
Ron Ely
Georgia Engel
Leif Erickson
John Ericson
Gene Evans
Maurice Evans
Jason Evers
Tom Ewell

Shelley Fabares
Fabian
Lola Falana
Stephanie Faracy
Shea Farrell
David Faustino
Cristina Ferrare
José Ferrer
Mel Ferrer
John Fiedler
Gail Fisher
Peggy Fleming
Joey Forman
Steve Forrest
Constance Forslund
Rosemary Forsyth
Phil Foster
Bernard Fox
Jonathan Frakes
Anne Francis
Genie Francis
Gary Frank
Pamela Franklin
Mary Frann
Robert Fuller
Annette Funicello

Eva Gabor
Holly Gagnier
Don Galloway
Sean Garrison
Steve Garvey
Dick Gautier
John Gavin
Michael V. Gazzo
Ellen Geer
Robert Gentry
Christopher George
Lynda Day George
Estelle Getty
Bond Gideon
Henry Gibson
Stefan Gierasch
Mickey Gilley
Richard Gilliland
Missy Gold
Tracey Gold
Arlene Golonka
Grant Goodeve
Lynda Goodfriend
Marjoe Gortner
Robert Goulet
Fred Grandy
Peter Graves
Erin Gray
Shecky Greene
Brodie Greer
Andy Griffith
David Groh
Harry Guardino

Hard Boiled Haggerty
Sid Haig
Alan Hale, Jr.
Brett Halsey
Jo Ann Harris
Jonathan Harris
Phil Harris
Jenilee Harrison
Lisa Hartman Black
Peter Haskell
Richard Hatch
David Hedison
Katherine Helmond
Sherman Hemsley
Florence Henderson
Justin Henry
Pamela Hensley
Don Ho
Celeste Holm
Skip Homeier
James Hong
Bo Hopkins
Telma Hopkins
James Houghton
Vince Howard
Ernie Hudson
Engelbert Humperdinck
Leann Hunley
Gayle Hunnicutt
Gunilla Hutton
Wilfrid Hyde-White

Sherry Jackson
Richard Jaeckel
Dennis James
John James
Rick Jason
Anne Jeffreys
Linda Thompson Jenner
Rita Jenrette
Maren Jensen
Ann Jillian
Arte Johnson
Van Johnson
Carolyn Jones
Henry Jones
Tom Jones
Elaine Joyce

Steve Kanaly
Casey Kasem
Jean Kasem
Dianne Kay
Caren Kaye
Roz Kelly
George Kennedy
Mabel King
Richard Kline
Don Knotts
Bernie Kopell
Apollonia Kotero
Yaphet Kotto
Katy Kurtzman
Stepfanie Kramer
Paul Kreppel
Nancy Kulp
Nancy Kwan

David Ladd
Lorenzo Lamas
Audrey Landers
Judy Landers
Hope Lange
Ted Lange
Kim Lankford
John Larroquette
Tommy Lasorda
Tammy Lauren
Peter Lawford
Carol Lawrence
Vicki Lawrence
Johnny Lee
Michele Lee
Ruta Lee
Janet Leigh
Michael Lembeck
Rosetta LeNoire
Rick Lenz
George Lindsey
Richard Lineback
Larry Linville
Cleavon Little
Rich Little
Eddie Little Sky
Ernie Lively
Doug Llewelyn
Heather Locklear
Robert Loggia
Claudia Lonow
Marjorie Lord
Gloria Loring
Lisa Loring
Tina Louise
Susan Lucci
Allen Ludden
James Luisi
Barbara Luna
Peter Lupus
Carol Lynley
Fred Lynn
Loretta Lynn
Sue Lyon
Robert F. Lyons

James MacArthur
Simon MacCorkindale
Janet MacLachlan
Murray MacLeod
Meredith MacRae
Dave Madden
Guy Madison
George Maharis
Mako
Robert Mandan
Larry Manetti
Joe Mantell
Randolph Mantooth
Monte Markham
Peter Marshall
Dick Martin
Dolly Martin
Jared Martin
Pamela Sue Martin
Ross Martin
A Martinez
Robin Mattson
Donald May
Mike Mazurki
Heather McAdam
Chuck McCann
Kevin McCarthy
Rue McClanahan
Leigh McCloskey
Doug McClure
John McCook
Patty McCormack
Maureen McCormick
Roddy McDowall
Mary Kate McGeehan
Ted McGinley
Dorothy McGuire
John McIntire
Philip McKeon
Jayne Meadows
Eddie Mekka
Sam Melville
Lee Meriwether
Art Metrano
Marilyn Michaels
Kari Michaelsen
Vera Miles
Ray Milland
Denny Miller
Donna Mills
Juliet Mills
Martin Milner
Cameron Mitchell
Mary Ann Mobley
Al Molinaro
Richard Moll
Belinda Montgomery
Alvy Moore
Terry Moore
Greg Morris
Howard Morris
Vic Morrow
Robert Morse
Howard Morton
William R. Moses
Donald Most
Diana Muldaur
Ben Murphy
Jan Murray

Reggie Nalder
Joe Namath
Hal Needham
Barry Nelson
Gene Nelson
Harriet Nelson
Julie Newmar
Leslie Nielsen
James Noble
Trisha Noble
Jeanette Nolan
Sheree North
France Nuyen
Louis Nye
Russell Nype

Randi Oakes
Hugh O'Brian
Donald O'Connor
J. Pat O'Malley
David Opatoshu
Heather O'Rourke

Janis Paige
Peter Palmer
Eleanor Parker
Barbara Parkins
Dennis Patrick
Richard Paul
Nehemiah Persoff
Donna Pescow
Paul Petersen
Cassandra Peterson
Joanna Pettet
Michelle Pfeiffer
Jo Ann Pflug
Regis Philbin
Barney Phillips
Michelle Phillips
Paul Picerni
Eve Plumb
Henry Polic II
Don Porter
Markie Post
Jane Powell
Randolph Powell
Victoria Principal
Joan Pringle
Juliet Prowse

Cristina Raines
Dack Rambo
Lou Rawls
Gene Rayburn
James Read
Helen Reddy
Quinn Redeker
Lynn Redgrave
Robert Reed
Shanna Reed
Alejandro Rey
Madlyn Rhue
Adam Rich
Kim Richards
Kyle Richards
Lou Richards
Susan Richardson
Peter Mark Richman
Robin Riker
Jack Riley
Doris Roberts
Tanya Roberts
Dale Robertson
Chris Robinson
Sugar Ray Robinson
Roxie Roker
Esther Rolle
Ruth Roman
Richard Romanus
Cesar Romero
Jamie Rose
Marion Ross
Tim Rossovich
Mark Roth
Dan Rowan
Misty Rowe
John Rubinstein
Barbara Rush

Raymond St. Jacques
Jill St. John
Paul Sand
Beverly Sanders
Richard Sanders
Dick Sargent
Lanna Saunders
Brad Savage
John Saxon
Avery Schreiber
John Schuck
Geoffrey Scott
Vito Scotti
Ronnie Scribner
Bob Seagren
Dick Shawn
Deborah Shelton
Cybill Shepherd
Mark Shera
Bobby Sherman
James Shigeta
John Wesley Shipp
Pamela Susan Shoop
Stephen Shortridge
Phil Silvers
Hal Smith
Martha Smith
Shelley Smith
William Smith
Dick Smothers
Tom Smothers
Julie Sommars
Elke Sommer
Laurette Spang
Camilla Sparv
Tori Spelling
Michael Spound
Jim Stafford
Skip Stephenson
Robert Sterling
Connie Stevens
Craig Stevens
Stella Stevens
Alana Stewart
Trish Stewart
Barbara Stock
Guy Stockwell
Christopher Stone
Larry Storch
Marcia Strassman
Dorothy Stratten
Woody Strode
Alan Sues
Barry Sullivan
Susan Sullivan
Donald Symington

Nita Talbot
Vic Tayback
Leigh Taylor-Young
Toni Tennille
Robert Tessier
Lauren Tewes
Tim Thomerson
Hilary Thompson
Gordon Thomson
Charlene Tilton
Berlinda Tolbert
Regis Toomey
Constance Towers
Fred Travalena
Bobby Troup
Ronne Troup
Forrest Tucker
Tanya Tucker
Ann Turkel
Joe Turkel
Glynn Turman
Lurene Tuttle
Shannon Tweed

Ellis Valentine
Karen Valentine
Mamie Van Doren
Jerry Van Dyke
Abe Vigoda
Sal Viscuso

Lyle Waggoner
Jimmie Walker
Nancy Walker
Marcia Wallace
Ray Walston
Laurie Walters
Vernee Watson
Patrick Wayne
Doodles Weaver
Mary Louise Weller
Gwen Welles
Danny Wells
Dawn Wells
Adam West
Jill Whelan
Stuart Whitman
Larry Wilcox
Anson Williams
Paul Williams
Fred Williamson
Marie Windsor
Jason Wingreen
Edward Winter
Iggie Wolfington
Lana Wood
Morgan Woodward
Tom Wopat
Jane Wyatt
George Wyner
Keenan Wynn
Dana Wynter

Cassie Yates
Dick York
Tony Young

Carmen Zapata
Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.